New research looks at the impact of new forms of gambling-like products on young people

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New research looks at the impact of new forms of gambling-like products on young people

New research funded by the NSW Government’s Responsible Gambling Fund shows that young adults aged 18-24 years old have different formative gambling experiences to those aged 25-29, and are more likely to report taking part in emerging forms of gambling and gambling-like activities, such as social casino games, before the age of 18.

The study, by Central Queensland University (CQU), found that people aged 18-24 appear to find traditional forms of gambling less appealing when compared to those aged 25-29.

The emergence of new forms of gambling and gambling-like products potentially expose young people to a gateway to gambling.

Director of the Office of Responsible Gambling, Natalie Wright, said “New gambling-like products, like free-to-play games, allow young people to learn about gambling, gain confidence through practice and potentially lead them to participate in traditional forms of gambling as they get older.”

The study found that all forms of gambling, both traditional and emerging, were associated with gambling harm.

“Young people, who we know are vulnerable to gambling harm, are drawn to emerging forms of gambling. Although some may not yet be experiencing harm, the higher uptake of newer forms of gambling by young people may sustain or even increase gambling harm in the future.” Ms Wright said.

The study looked to understand how gambling is changing in New South Wales, particularly amongst young adults, and the impact of newer forms of gambling and gambling-like products.

The CQU research found:

Compared to 25 – 29 year olds, 18–24 year olds:

  • were more likely to have taken part in emerging forms of gambling and simulated gambling except when it required expenditure
  • are less engaged with traditional gambling forms
  • were more likely to recall first taking part in traditional and emerging forms of gambling while under the age of 18.

Compared to 18-24 year olds, those aged 25 – 29:

  • were more likely to have taken part in traditional forms of gambling
  • were more likely to recall being exposed to gambling via adults in their household.

To view a copy of the report, please visit the Office of Responsible Gambling website.

For those needing help with gambling issues, help is available 24/7 on 1800 858 858.

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